While Ardmore Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #108 has approved a 2008/2009 contract between union members and the City of Ardmore, FOP leaders said the final outcome of the collective bargaining agreement contains some very disappointing elements.

 


While Ardmore Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #108 has approved a 2008/2009 contract between union members and the City of Ardmore, FOP leaders said the final outcome of the collective bargaining agreement contains some very disappointing elements.


FOP President Cpl. Bobby Moore said the agreement, which goes before the city commission for approval Tuesday night, demonstrates the city’s lack of support and concern for the community’s police officers.


“They always want. They never want to give,” Moore said. “They (city) call it whining and complaining on our part. We’re not whining, but we do want to be shown some support and respect. Right now there is little or no respect for the officers or the jobs we do. That makes it hard.”


Moore said the FOP’s two main issues are stress management and compensation.
“We’re getting a 4.4 percent raise just like the rest of the city’s employees. They (city) have been alluding it’s a 7.4 percent raise because of the 3 percent step increase. The 3 percent step increase is an anniversary date increase. Other city employees also get step increases, which was not part of their 4.4 percent raise. It’s not fair to suggest we’re receiving something above what other employees are getting,” Moore said.


Moore confirmed an additional step has been added to sergeants’ salary range under the new contract.


“But that’s what the city wanted. The FOP wanted the extra step for all officers. We already have nine officers who have maxed out of the step increase and three others who will max out within the next few months,” Moore said.


 “We also asked for a very small shift differential pay. We asked those officers serving on the busiest shift, the 3  to 11 p.m. shift, receive an extra 15 cents per hour and those on the next busiest shift, 11 p.m. to 7 a.m., receive an extra 10 cents per hour. That was denied.”


Moore said the city also ignored the FOP’s efforts to gain down time for officers in an effort to reduce job stress.


“We get one personal day a year. We asked for more personal days and one hour per month added to our vacation time. They (city negotiators) wouldn’t work with us. They turned us down,” Moore said.


Other areas of conflict include the loss of an additional day off for officers serving “on-call” weeks. Under the new contract, investigators will earn $130 during their “on-call” week, but will give up a replacement day off.


“This is a stress issue. What is needed is down time — that  day off,” Moore said.


Under the new contract, “on-call” captains will receive just $50 per week when assigned to “on-call” duty.


“Since days off were not going to be given for on-call, FOP negotiators attempted to get the captains the same money as investigators. That was denied too,” Moore said.


While the FOP is less than pleased that they were unable to resolve many issues they believe are important to overall officer well-being, they were able to reach an agreement that, if the commission approves it, will end months of impasse and lift restrictions, like step-pay increases, that have been held up due to the lack of a new contract.