Vicky Williams said one of her greatest strengths is her ability to interact with people, and it’s a skill she used almost daily in her job as the certified municipal court clerk in Ardmore.


Vicky Williams said one of her greatest strengths is her ability to interact with people, and it’s a skill she used almost daily in her job as the certified municipal court clerk in Ardmore.


“It’s a God-given gift,” she said. “I don’t take on the person’s problem. I just listen. I treat people the way I’d like to be treated.”


Ardmore Municipal Court Judge David Blankenship gave his former clerk a glowing endorsement.


“If she gets a job where she’s supposed to deal

with the public, everyone will love her,” he said. “I couldn’t have asked for a better court clerk.”
Williams and her husband, Dennis, are moving to Bristow to be closer to their son, daughter-in-law and grandchildren.


Friday was her last day of work in city hall after 24 years of service. Williams worked eight years in the police department’s records division before accepting the court clerk’s job. Former City Clerk Penny Long gave her all of three hours to make up her mind, Williams said.


“I love this job,” she said on her next-to-last day of work. “I love working with the people. Each case is an individual case. They are not all alike.”


The municipal court clerk is responsible for preparing all of the court dockets, talking to the public about court matters, collecting fine payments and helping the judge in the courtroom.
“Court is my favorite part,” she said. “It’s interesting because of the stories people tell about why they got arrested for public intoxication or why they didn’t pay their tickets.”


Williams’ replacement, Jill Henry who filled similar positions in Del City and Mt. Clemens, Mich., agreed.


“It’s very interesting,” she said. ‘Everybody has a story. It’s probably Kay’s (deputy court clerk Kay Ocheltree) favorite part, too.”


Williams said it’s important to maintain one’s sense of decorum in the courtroom even when a defendant’s “story” veers off in an unexpected direction.


“I don’t laugh. I smile,” she said.


Williams predicted Henry will be just fine in her new job.


“You have to be a people person or you won’t make it,” Williams said. “It takes patience.”
Henry nodded her head in agreement.


“A lot of patience,” she said.


Steve Biehn, 221-6546
steve.biehn@ardmoreite.com