Folks who are tracing their family history in the area may want to consult the Mary Jones Wilson Archives in the Wilson Historical Museum.

 


Folks who are tracing their family history in the area may want to consult the Mary Jones Wilson Archives in the Wilson Historical Museum.


Wilson, who lives in Healdton, has compiled information on Ringling, Healdton, Ardmore and many other communities.


“People have loaned me pictures and written their memories about Wheeler, Oil City, Rexroat and Orr,” Wilson said. “I have donated the history I had of Velma and Santa Fe. Santa Fe was about four miles south of Velma. It was one of the early oil boom towns.”


She also compiled information about an orphans’ home in Cornish started in 1903. This research is among her archives at the Wilson Historical Museum at 100 NE 1st St. in Wilson.
She has also given presentations on Quanah Parker at area schools such as Comanche and Wilson.


“I wanted to challenge young people to set a goal and set a dream that they wish to achieve in life,” Wilson said. “When (Quanah Parker) surrendered in 1875, he became the richest Indian in the United States. He divided the money among the tribes.”


She said she used to volunteer at the Wilson Historical Museum every Friday, but she only goes when she can now due to health reasons. She said many people don’t realize how war has shown a definite impact on some of the small communities she has researched.


“Wheeler High School closed because so many had to go to service in World War II,” Wilson said. “Attendance just fell.”


Born in Wheeler on Dec. 28, 1927, Wilson said her mother’s family came to Oil City in 1897. In gathering information about her family, she found books about her great-grandfather, Preston Perkins.


“He was scalped by a Comanche Indian on Salt Creek down by Jacksboro, Texas, in 1966,” she said.


Sheila J. Robinson, 221-6536
sheila.robinson@ardmoreite.com