Residents of Kingston and other communities surrounding Lake Texoma came to the Kingston school gymnasium Tuesday night to meet with members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, who were presenting information concerning the upcoming impact statement.


Residents of Kingston and other communities surrounding Lake Texoma came to the Kingston school gymnasium Tuesday night to meet with members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, who were presenting information concerning the upcoming impact statement.


The Corps will collect questions and concerns from the meeting and use them to guide their study of the effects of Pointe Vista’s development on Lake Texoma.


Steve Nolan with the Army Corps of Engineers said he hopes concerned citizens come forward with their concerns.


“That’s why we’re here,” he said. “We’re here to find out what their concerns are and what they would like to see in this impact statement.”


The meeting was the first step in what Nolan called the Scoping Process, where the Corps solicits suggestions, comments and questions about the proposed development. Tuesday night’s meeting was more informal than previous meetings, with no speakers or set agenda. Maps showing the areas included in the proposed impact study were displayed around the gym, and representatives from the Corps of Engineers answered questions.


Many of the questions asked concerned the welfare of endangered and protected species whose habitats could be disturbed by the development. Others included possible lands that would become state park land to replace land sold to Pointe Vista. The areas proposed as possible replacements include the West Caney, Buncombe Creek, Johnson Creek and Lakeside areas.


Jo Moore lives south of the old Texoma Lodge, and came to the meeting because she wanted to know how the development would affect her home and surrounding property.


“I was interested in what was going to happen south of the Rooster Creek bridge,” Moore said. “I wanted to know what to expect.”


Moore said the Corps and the information they presented helped to mitigate some of her concerns.


“The map showed basically what’s going to be where; it was helpful,” she said.


Not everyone at the meeting was so easily swayed. Stephen Willis, director of the Friends of Lake Texoma and longtime Pointe Vista opponent, passed out copies of a newsletter called “The Lake Texoma Messenger” at the meeting.


In the newsletter, Willis called the previous Environmental Assessment report done in 2005 “flawed and fraudulent” and that the report violated “key federal conservation laws.”


“No one has disputed these claims that we have made,” Willis said.


When asked about Willis’ accusations, Nolan had no comment aside from “those are his words, not mine.”


Those who were unable to attend the Tuesday night meeting can ask questions or offer comments or concerns to be addressed in the Environmental Impact Statement by e-mail to stephen.l.nolen@usace.army.mil or by phone at (918) 669-7660.