* HISTORY

Clint Williams, the original owner of the company, formed the Texoma Peanut Company in 1961 as a bulk peanut drying, handling and storage operation for area peanut shellers.

 


*HISTORY

 

Clint Williams, the original owner of the company, formed the Texoma Peanut Company in 1961 as a bulk peanut drying, handling and storage operation for area peanut shellers.

 

Since then, the company has expanded to offer peanut blanching, or skin removal. The company offers all four genetic types of peanuts grown in the United States, processed in both in-shell and shelled varieties.

 

Current owner Alan Ortloss, Williams’ son-in-law, said the shelling facility can process 400 tons of peanuts a day; about 20 truckloads and 10 truckloads per day in the in-shell facility.

 

Ortloss said the company is only known locally as “Texoma Peanut Company.”

 

“If you ask Skippy peanut butter or Planters or M&M Mars about Texoma Peanut Company, they probably won’t know who you’re talking about,” he said. “If you say the Clint Williams Company, that’s how we’re known all over the world.”

 

He said the Clint Williams Company specializes in a type of peanut with a high linoleic acid content, which increases their shelf life.

 

The company’s largest domestic customer is M&M Mars for use in candy bars and snacks.

 

Early in the company’s existence, it found a niche as an exporter of peanuts overseas.

 

To this day, vast amounts of peanuts processed at the plant are shipped to countries around the world.

* WHO WORKS THERE

 

Ortloss said the company employs an average of 250 employees. During the peak of harvest season, additional workers are hired, pushing the number to almost 400.

 

During the off season, as few as 150 employees work for the company. He said an agricultural background is useful, but most of the general labor positions do not require additional skills.

 

Several mid-supervisors are required to help with the plant’s regular transition from processing one type of peanut to another, which occurs several times throughout the year.

* WHY MADILL?

 

Ortloss said the company was started in Madill to be in close proximity to the “hub” of the peanut crop in southern Oklahoma and north Texas. Now the crop has spread into western Oklahoma, northwest Texas and New Mexico. But moving the entire facility to follow the crop’s expansion isn’t something Ortloss is considering.

 

“It would take a huge amount of money to move,” he said. “So far, we’ve got enough advantages and niches to get a better price that it’s worthwhile to stay here.”

 

He said on a personal level, he has no desire to leave Madill.

 

“I love it here,” he said. “I don’t want to leave.”

* PLANS FOR THE FUTURE

 

The company is looking into possible locations in western Oklahoma or Texas to build a second processing facility closer to peanut producers west of Marshall County. But, Ortloss reiterated that the facilities and offices in Madill aren’t going anywhere.