Narcotics officers seized more than 30 grams of the extremely potent form of methamphetamine known as ice, marijuana and an illegal firearm from a Springer residence Monday morning and arrested a woman believed to have been selling the drugs for months.

 


Narcotics officers seized more than 30 grams of the extremely potent form of methamphetamine known as ice, marijuana and an illegal firearm from a Springer residence Monday morning and arrested a woman believed to have been selling the drugs for months.

 

Capt. Gregg Johnson, Carter County Sheriff’s Department Narcotics Division said Catalina Velasquez was taken into custody without incident and booked into the Carter County Detention Center pending charges of trafficking methamphetamine, possession of narcotics and possession of an illegal sawed-off shotgun. Velasquez’s arrest came on the heels of an undercover investigation conducted by the CCSD narcotics and Ardmore Police Department narcotics and ended months of citizen tips concerning allegations the 36-year-old woman was dealing drugs from her Main Street Springer residence.

 

“Everything came together today (Monday),” Johnson said, describing the undercover investigation that led to an actual “buy” from Velasquez at her home. Subsequently, authorities conducted a search of the residence where the substantial stash of ice, with a street value of $3,000, marijuana and the illegal weapon were seized.

 

Johnson said it appears Velasquez was the sole operator of the illicit drug operation. He said authorities suspect she was obtaining her supply of methamphetamine from another state. No other arrests are expected.

 

Undersheriff Milton Anthony said Velasquez’s arrest and the take down of the drug house is an example that all tips are vital, but sometimes cases like this one take months to bring to a successful conclusion.

 

Information from citizens is one of the most critical elements in these types of cases. Leads are essential and leads are the reason we do check out each and every piece of information we get. All of the information we receive is added to the data we have. What is important for the public to remember is that in some cases, like this one, it’s like working with pieces of a puzzle and until we have enough pieces of the puzzle to start forming a picture we can’t take appropriate action,” Anthony said.

 

“This time we got the puzzle piece we needed and the investigation came together and worked exactly as it should have. That’s why everyone needs to know that whatever information they have is important and even if they don’t see action right away it doesn’t mean we disregarded what they said or that we are not working on it.”

 

Marsha Miller
 221-6529