Just call her Dr. Doolittle. Or St. Frances. Or even Florence Nightengale. Any of these labels would be appropriate for this nice Ardmore lady who has a way with our fine-feathered friends.


 


On a sunny afternoon, Elmbrook Nursing Home resident Florence Kirk was enjoying the pleasant outdoor weather on the patio when a mockingbird crashed into a glass door nearby. The bird lay motionless in front of the door and Kirk was sure it had broken its neck.


 


But just in case, and even though she was in a wheelchair, she rushed to the bird’s side and picked it up, fearing it might be crushed by someone coming through the door.


Just call her Dr. Doolittle. Or St. Frances. Or even Florence Nightengale. Any of these labels would be appropriate for this nice Ardmore lady who has a way with our fine-feathered friends.

 

On a sunny afternoon, Elmbrook Nursing Home resident Florence Kirk was enjoying the pleasant outdoor weather on the patio when a mockingbird crashed into a glass door nearby. The bird lay motionless in front of the door and Kirk was sure it had broken its neck.

 

But just in case, and even though she was in a wheelchair, she rushed to the bird’s side and picked it up, fearing it might be crushed by someone coming through the door.

 

Nurse Elaine Polizzo said Kirk then began stroking the still bird, who eventually came to and stood up in her hand. It was like a picture out of National Geographic that would accompany a story titled “To Save a Mockingbird.”

 

“She picked it up and petted it and it stood up in her hand and stayed there for about 10 minutes,” Polizzo said. “We all got to see it and stroke it. It was really cool to see it standing there. And we got some great pictures, too.”

 

The human/bird relationship was short-lived, however, as some children came through the door and scared the bird, which flew away, apparently none the worse for wear from its experience.

 

“It was the neatest thing,” Polizzo said. “It’s something we won’t soon forget. She really saved that bird’s life.”