In honor of Law Day, the Carter County Bar Association has awarded its annual scholarships.


Scholarships of $1,000 are awarded to high school seniors on the basis of community leadership, work ethic and dedication to service. Each applicant had to write about a topic provided by the bar association.


“All graduating seniors need to go to college and the expenses have increased over the years,” said John Worthen, association secretary/treasurer. “We hope the recipients will keep in mind the standards of these individuals who their scholarships honor.”


In honor of Law Day, the Carter County Bar Association has awarded its annual scholarships.

 

Scholarships of $1,000 are awarded to high school seniors on the basis of community leadership, work ethic and dedication to service. Each applicant had to write about a topic provided by the bar association.

 

“All graduating seniors need to go to college and the expenses have increased over the years,” said John Worthen, association secretary/treasurer. “We hope the recipients will keep in mind the standards of these individuals who their scholarships honor.”
 

 

Makenzie Herrin
Lone Grove senior Makenzie Herrin was struck by the essay topic on actions to reduce the cost and maintain the quality of education in Carter County.

 

“It’s just common sense. Being in school all day, these are the things I notice more than the community because I’m here,” Herrin said.

 

Her ideas included implementing a four-day school week, reduce the emphasis on athletics and extracurricular activities and reducing electricity usage.

 

She is the chapter president of the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America and a member of National Honor Society.

 

Her scholarship is in memory of Carter County attorney and civic leader James W. Williams.

 

She plans to attend the University of Oklahoma, study nutrition and become a doctor.
 

 

Juliann Jantz
Dickson High School senior Juliann Jantz wrote about how federal funds should be used for abortions.

 

“I don’t agree with abortion, but it’s every woman’s right to choose. However, sometimes they can’t choose because they don’t have the money,” Jantz said.

 

In her essay, she discussed the financial and emotional impacts of abortions and teenage pregnancies, referencing personal experience, federal law and pop culture.

 

She is also valedictorian of her class, a student council officer and founder of the Dickson Community Youth Center.

 

Her scholarship is in memory of Earl Gray, Carter County attorney and former president of the Oklahoma Bar Association.

 

She plans to study zoology at the University of Oklahoma, study zoology and become a marine biologist.
 

 

Patrick McSweeney
Ardmore High School senior Patrick McSweeney went with a topic he has discussed many times with his friends — should Ardmore and Plainview school districts be consolidated.

 

“It’s something I always believed would help both schools and Ardmore as a town,” McSweeney said.

 

He points out the benefits of consolidation with greater numbers, ability to offer more classes, combining community support for bond issues and the need for more diversity.

 

He is the student council president, the traveling team captain for the Ardmore City Thespians and a state qualifier in tennis.

 

His scholarship is in memory of Ezra Dyer, Carter County attorney and civic leader.

 

He plans to attend the University of Oklahoma, major in political science and journalism and possibly attend law school.