It started out as a project for the grandchildren that has evolved into a work of art.


 


Looming 80 feet into the air and encompassing 5,000 square feet, Linnie Woods’ tree house at 2410 Mockingbird Road east of Ardmore is a sight to see, and it’s even eco-friendly.


 


Made out of scrap materials, this one-of-a-kind masterpiece is an ever-evolving project that draws plenty of attention from passers-by.


It started out as a project for the grandchildren that has evolved into a work of art.

 

Looming 80 feet into the air and encompassing 5,000 square feet, Linnie Woods’ tree house at 2410 Mockingbird Road east of Ardmore is a sight to see, and it’s even eco-friendly.

 

Made out of scrap materials, this one-of-a-kind masterpiece is an ever-evolving project that draws plenty of attention from passers-by.

 

Built around a 60-foot oak tree, the tree house has a variety of levels, swings, passageways and hideouts that keep his grandchildren busy for hours.

 

“It probably has 30 rooms,” Woods said of the project that his wife, Judy, dubbed an obsession. “It spirals around the tree and I eventually want it to spiral around on the outside, too.”

 

The materials and scrap lumber all came from job sites where Woods worked in construction. Archways and supports are made of scrap limbs and stairs and ladders are constructed from anything Woods finds available. Gray weathered boards are nailed next to newer blond planks as Wood continues the project.

 

“I tore down an old barn to make a fence line,” he said. “It’s all put together with hand-driven nails. We have had some 80 mile-per-hour winds and not lost a board.”

 

The tree house features a red door and some red trimming, and is decorated with old lanterns, concrete blocks, signs and a chiminea. It’s even wired with electricity on the inside, with large-bulb Christmas lights and neon signs providing illumination.

 

“The garden outside has already produced some squash,” Woods said. “The grandkids love it and we get all kinds of visitors. People tell other people and they come out. My wife and I, we sit out there in recliners and watch the hummingbirds. It’s definitely a work in progress.”

 

Woods even has a MySpace page (Woods Treehouse) dedicated to the project, which includes directions and an e-mail address, woodstreehouse@yahoo.com, He’s more than willing to give tours if anyone wants to drop by.

 

“We’re happy to have people come see it,” he said. “It’s always changing, so there’s always something new to see.”