The next time you stroll through Central Park, you will notice two new granite benches. Visitors to Ardmore High School will notice two new granite sculptures on campus.


The next time you stroll through Central Park, you will notice two new granite benches. Visitors to Ardmore High School will notice two new granite sculptures on campus.

 

Ardmore residents can look forward to more “Art in Public Places” being installed in the area in the future.

 

The Charles B. Goddard Center offers workshops taught by granite sculptor Jesús Moroles, who joined the center’s teaching roster in 2008. The workshops include spots for Outreach participants, in addition to traditional students. In the first workshop, Moroles worked alongside students enrolled in

 

“Possibilites,” a Carter County Health Department program.

 

Ardmore Middle and High School students, Evette Corona, Benjamin Gonzalez, Karina Hernandez, Juana Rivera, Jeremy Salinas and Mayra Soto all worked together under Moroles’ instruction to design and create the benches in Central Park.

 

The second workshop included Ardmore High School students Treyon Grant and M. Payton Stein. These students created two granite sculptures that have been installed near the front doors of the school. A third workshop included Lone Grove High School students Brooke Kelty and Ashley Donham.

 

Their sculptures have not yet been installed, as the location is yet to be determined. The fourth workshop is today through Sunday and will include Plainview High School students Julie Grice and Lewis Key.

 

“In an age when technology has taken over, we are able to go back to creating with our own hands,” Moroles said. “I think the students are proud of learning how to use the tools and how not to be afraid of working with them. If they can work with this unyielding stone material with hammers, chisels, diamond tipped saws and grinders, they can do anything.

 

“Granite is the hardest and most gratifying material to work in because it will be here forever,” he said.

 

“The sculptures that are made at these workshops will stand the test of time and be enjoyed for generations to come. I’ve enjoyed working with all these students and look forward to the next school group.”

 

Among his distinctions, Moroles was awarded the National Medal of Arts for the Visual Arts, where he was recognized by President Bush for “his enduring achievements as a sculptor of stone.” The National Medal of Arts, established by Congress in 1984, is awarded by the president and managed by the National Endowment for the Arts. Award recipients are selected based on their contributions to the creation, growth and support of the arts in the United States.

 

The student’s participation was made possible through the support of “Art in Public Places,” a project of the Ardmore Chamber of Commerce Foundation. The program, instituted in 2004, has been responsible for placement of art and sculpture throughout the community.

 

The Goddard Center will offer its Moroles workshop on March 12-15, 2011. The cost for each workshop is $500 and lunch is included. The workshops take place at Jan Tindale’s farm in Ardmore. There is also room to camp at the workshop site for those who need overnight accommodations. Those interested can call the Goddard Center at (580) 226-0909. For more information, visit the Web site http://www.goddardcenter.org/classes.html.