In response to an article in the Oct. 8 edition of The Ardmoreite about a campaign sign placed near a school campus, several readers raised other questions about what types of political activity are permis


In response to an article in the Oct. 8 edition of The Ardmoreite about a campaign sign placed near a school campus, several readers raised other questions about what types of political activity are permissible on school grounds.

 

And similar questions have come up in other parts of the state. For example, a Stillwater legislator’s innocent use of visual campaign material in a presentation at an elementary school classroom recently caused his opponent to publicly question his judgment. So what exactly is permissible?

 

Q. Is it proper for someone who is campaigning for office to advertise on school football, softball and baseball fields? In most instances, school booster

 

clubs sell the space to advertisers to support various school activities.
A. Darey Roberts, a spokesman for the Oklahoma Ethics Commission, said it is fine as long as the other candidates running for the same office have an equal opportunity to purchase similar advertising.

Q. What about advertising in high school football programs?

 

A. Roberts said the same standard as above applies.

Q. Can candidates hand out campaign material on school grounds?

 

A. State campaign laws permit candidates to hand out leaflets and other materials in public areas, such as sidewalks and parking lots, but not in “common” areas where work is going on.

Q. Can candidates place campaign signs on school grounds?

 

A. Political signs cannot be placed on public property, and Oklahoma Ethics Commission Executive Director Marilyn Hughes said campaign signs cannot be attached to the ground or walls on school property.

Q. When a candidate is campaigning at a football game, can he stand blocking the stadium entrance so you have to take his leaflets or stickers?

 

A. Roberts said the issue isn’t something that is addressed in state ethics laws, so there is nothing specific to prevent it. However, many of those running for and in office stand outside stadium gates to give people the option of accepting their materials.

Steve Biehn, 221-6546