There’s no trick to helping children stay safe on Halloween, according to AAA. All it takes is for motorists to be alert and cautious.



“This year, we’re getting a double dose of Halloween,” said Chuck Mai, spokesman for AAA Oklahoma. “Many communities have designated Saturday, Oct. 30, as trick-or-treat night but there’s a good chance that kids will also be out making their candy-collecting rounds on Halloween night, Oct. 31, as well. Drivers should anticipate that streets will be full of kids both evenings.”


There’s no trick to helping children stay safe on Halloween, according to AAA. All it takes is for motorists to be alert and cautious.

“This year, we’re getting a double dose of Halloween,” said Chuck Mai, spokesman for AAA Oklahoma. “Many communities have designated Saturday, Oct. 30, as trick-or-treat night but there’s a good chance that kids will also be out making their candy-collecting rounds on Halloween night, Oct. 31, as well. Drivers should anticipate that streets will be full of kids both evenings.”

Here are AAA’s tips for a safe Halloween:

The speed limit in most residential neighborhoods is 25 mph but when children are out trick-or-treating, it’s a good idea to drive even more slowly. Be aware that youngsters may attempt to cross mid-block or between parked cars. Look for children’s shoes or costumes under vehicles as clues that kids may suddenly dart out into the street from between parked cars. Children may be difficult to see if they are wearing dark costumes. Kids who are wearing masks will have an obstructed view of cars. Obey all traffic signs, signals and markings. If your children are trick-or-treating, make sure they follow safety rules and that their costumes are visible and fit properly. When driving trick-or-treaters through neighborhoods, don’t forget to use appropriate car seats and have children exit and enter the vehicle on the passenger side. Designate a sober driver if you plan to drink alcohol.


Children who are out trick-or-treating need to see and be seen. Encourage kids to travel neighborhoods in groups, to carry flashlights and to use reflective tape or stickers on costumes and treat bags.