Ardmore police nabbed a Tucson, Ariz., man Saturday for allegedly passing and possessing counterfeit $100 bills, but he apparently isn’t alone in the effort to scam local merchants with the fake cash.

 


Ardmore police nabbed a Tucson, Ariz., man Saturday for allegedly passing and possessing counterfeit $100 bills, but he apparently isn’t alone in the effort to scam local merchants with the fake cash.

 

Cpl. Chad Anthony, Ardmore Police Department Public Information Officer, said 35-year-old Jason Patrick Jones was taken into custody after a clerk, who realized she had just been conned into accepting one of the counterfeit bills, managed to get the tag number of the car he was driving as he made his escape.

 

“The car came back to an Ardmore address. Officers went to the address, found Mr. Jones and arrested him,” Anthony said.

 

Jones spent the weekend in the Carter County Detention Center pending local charges and on Arizona warrants seeking his arrest. Monday he was formally charged by the district attorney’s office in Carter County District Court. Jones made an initial court appearance Monday afternoon, facing possession of methamphetamine and second-degree forgery (possessing counterfeit $100 bills) charges. Bond is set at $75,000.

 

Anthony confirmed in the past few weeks a number of local merchants have reported accepting counterfeit bills.

 

“We received another report on Monday from a store that apparently accepted the bill on Saturday,” Anthony said, adding counterfeit $20 are also being circulated in the community and Jones might not be the only person playing a role in the scheme.

 

“We are urging merchants to remind their clerks to really be aware take a close look at the money they accept. If they are unsure about what to look for there is excellent information of the Secret Services Web site under ‘Know Your Money.’”

 

The Web site can be found at www.secretservice.gov/know_your_money.shtml.
The Web site not only provides information on “How To Detect counterfeit Money” it also gives supplies the following tips on what to do if a suspected counterfeit bill has been accepted:

* Do not return it to the passer

 

* Delay the passer if possible.

 

* Observe the passer’s description, as well as that of any companions

 

* Obtain the license plate numbers of any vehicles used

 

* Contact local police or United States Secret Service field office

 

* Write your initials and the date in the white border areas of the suspect bill

 

 * Limit the handling of the bill

 

* Carefully place the bill in a protective covering, such as an envelope.

 

* Surrender the bill only to a properly identified police officer or a U.S. Secret Service special agent

 

Marsha Miller 221-6529