Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control, an American will have a coronary event every 25 seconds; about one every minute will die from one.




What can you do to reduce your chances of developing coronary heart disease? Knowing the risk factors is critical.




Risk factors include high cholesterol, high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes, tobacco use and secondhand smoke.




Medical conditions that affect your heart or increase your risk of death or disability from a coronary event include arrhythmia, heart failure and peripheral artery disease (PAD).


Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control, an American will have a coronary event every 25 seconds; about one every minute will die from one.


What can you do to reduce your chances of developing coronary heart disease? Knowing the risk factors is critical.


Risk factors include high cholesterol, high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes, tobacco use and secondhand smoke.


Medical conditions that affect your heart or increase your risk of death or disability from a coronary event include arrhythmia, heart failure and peripheral artery disease (PAD).


Knowing the signs and symptoms is important so that if you do have heart attack, you can seek treatment as quickly as possible. These include:

Chest discomfort. It may last more than a few minutes, or go away and come back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain. Discomfort in other areas of the upper body, including one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach. Shortness of breath. May occur with or without chest discomfort. Breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea, or lightheadedness.


Should you experience any of these signs it is important to call 9-1-1 immediately. Remember that some heart attacks are sudden and intense; however, most heart attacks start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort.