Parents and teachers of early elementary school children should watch for warning signs of visual problems, said a pediatric ophthalmologist from Baylor College of Medicine.


 




"A first, second or third grader may not always tell his or her parents that they are having trouble seeing," said Dr. Evelyn Paysse, associate professor of ophthalmology at BCM. "If the child cannot see, he or she might have a difficult time learning and keeping up with the rest of the class."


Parents and teachers of early elementary school children should watch for warning signs of visual problems, said a pediatric ophthalmologist from Baylor College of Medicine.

 


"A first, second or third grader may not always tell his or her parents that they are having trouble seeing," said Dr. Evelyn Paysse, associate professor of ophthalmology at BCM. "If the child cannot see, he or she might have a difficult time learning and keeping up with the rest of the class."

 


Parents and teachers should watch for certain behaviors that might indicate the child needs to have a vision screening, Paysse said. These include:

Sitting close to the television Holding a book close to the face while reading Squinting, blinking or rubbing eyes more than normal

 

Children exhibiting these signs should first be screened by a pediatrician or the school nurse, who can determine if a child needs a comprehensive exam with an eye care specialist.

 

Glasses are typically recommended for younger children, while contacts are appropriate for children starting at about 10 or 11 years old.