A summer of heat that includes temperatures often reaching 100 degrees or more is settling into Oklahoma with little relief in sight for the next two months, the National Weather Service said Monday.


A summer of heat that includes temperatures often reaching 100 degrees or more is settling into Oklahoma with little relief in sight for the next two months, the National Weather Service said Monday.


“It’s interesting to heat up so early in June. Our only hope is that a tropical system comes through and moistens us up here,” said meteorologist Marc Austin with the weather service in Norman.


But, Austin said, that typically doesn’t occur until late August or early September.
“We’re still looking at these astounding temperatures through the holiday weekend, unfortunately,” he said.


Highs are forecast to reach 105 to 110 degrees through the start of next week, according to Austin, with the possible exception of Tuesday, when temperatures may be held in the low to middle 90s by a weak cold front approaching the state from the northwest.


The heat is suspected in the June 18 death of Brenda Nustvold, 47, of Enid, who was found dead in her yard about 5 p.m. Neighbors told police Nustvold had been working in her yard since about 9:30 a.m.


Her cause of death was still pending Monday, according to Amy Elliott, a spokeswoman for the state medical examiner’s office in Oklahoma City.


The weather service has issued a heat advisory and warns residents to avoid prolonged exposure to the heat.


Austin said there is the possibility of slightly milder temperatures around 90 degrees next week, based on a front now in the western United States.


“It’s hard to say exactly what is going to happen for sure, but at least one of the long range models is indicating some relief. But that’s not until the middle of next week and they change so much over time,” he said.


Highs in the low 90s and overnight lows in the upper 60s to lower 70s are considered normal for late June, Austin said.