With goop-covered hands, flying rockets and exploding volcanos, Will Rogers Elementary students showed Friday that you are never too young to explore the world around you.


 


Completing projects either individually or as a class, students went through the scientific process of asking questions and reaching con­clusions.


 


Mandy Battice’s preschool students grew grass that served as hair on little people made out of hose, dirt and foam sandals.


 


“I like grass dressed like a person because it looks prettier,” Meika Spears said.


With goop-covered hands, flying rockets and exploding volcanos, Will Rogers Elementary students showed Friday that you are never too young to explore the world around you.

 

Completing projects either individually or as a class, students went through the scientific process of asking questions and reaching con­clusions.

 

Mandy Battice’s preschool students grew grass that served as hair on little people made out of hose, dirt and foam sandals.

 

“I like grass dressed like a person because it looks prettier,” Meika Spears said.

 

While he has never flown before, transitional first-grader Jose Ortiz looked to the skies to inspire his project. He built a simple bottle rocket.

 

“I liked making it fly because I would probably like flying,” he said.

 

Miguel Gonzalez enjoyed the tastiness of his project. After eating the meat, the transitional first-grader took chicken bones and soaked them in vinegar.

 

The result was that the bones turned surpris­ingly soft.

 

“It was fun putting the bones in vinegar,” Gonzalez said.

 

Kindergartner John McCourt made goop out of water and cornstarch.

 

“The best part is getting to mix it and it’s messy,” McCourt said.

 

James Horton studied tornados, making his own miniature version using coke bottles and water.

 

“I like it,” Horton said. “We saw it spin really fast and blow off parts of houses.”