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The Daily Ardmoreite
  • RX loopholes black hole for law enforcement and law abiding citizens

  • Do Oklahoma laws actually protect RX drugged drivers from effective prosecution, even in the case of DUID fatality? And, what about those who provide prescription medication to the driving public? Police and first responders have “had it” with the status quo and state Rep. Richard Morrissette (D-OKC) and the governor’s office say that there are potential remedies.
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  • Do Oklahoma laws actually protect RX drugged drivers from effective prosecution, even in the case of DUID fatality? And, what about those who provide prescription medication to the driving public? Police and first responders have “had it” with the status quo and state Rep. Richard Morrissette (D-OKC) and the governor’s office say that there are potential remedies.
     
    Thursday an offical interim study will begin at 1:30 p.m. In Room 432A at the state Capitol. Scheduled to present include Commissioner Terri White, Director Dept. of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, Gary Thomas, State Director for Oklahoma Highway Safety, and State DRE Deputy Director, Jim Maisano as well as Per Se Law experts Anne Teigen, Senior Policy Specialist NCSL and Holly Henderson, Policy Specialist, NCSL Health. Darryl Weaver, Director of OK Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, will report on the state of “doctor shopping” in Oklahoma and there will be provided the testimony of Dr. Robert DuPont, Director of the Institute for Behavioral Health.
     
    Presently in Oklahoma, our physicians write more prescriptions for RX opiates than anywhere in the United State of America. And, more Oklahomans are seriously addicted, using these medications for non-medical purposes with all of the negative consequences including unemployability, poor health and broken families.
     
    Recommendations for curbing RX opiate abuse in Oklahoma include adoption of per se laws, increased alerts by OBN to physicians of “doctor shopping” by their patients, physicians to regularly reference the PMP ( prescription drug monitoring system that logs patient RX activity), victim impact panels and funding for drug treatment programs and programs of law enforcement.
     
    “I know that if we could implement something to help with gathering stats on our DUID incidents we could use that data to access grants for treatment and funding for our police officers who are now so frustrated by what they have to work with…the governor’s office has also asked to work together on this initiative and I couldn’t be more pleased. This is a complex problem that will require contributions from all. This is definitely not a partisan issue.” concluded Morrissette.
     
    The interim study is open to the public parking on the south side of the Capitol in VISITOR designated parking. Enter through the southeast security entrance and take elevator to the 4th floor – north side of rotunda – Room 432A. Seating is limited with the hearing before the Public Health Committee, Chaired by Rep. John Enns.
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