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The Daily Ardmoreite
  • Fact or folklore: Students test the tale

  • According to folklore, one can predict the harshness of winter by the shape of the kernel inside a persimmon seed.
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  • jennifer.lindsey@ardmoreite.com
    According to folklore, one can predict the harshness of winter by the shape of the kernel inside a persimmon seed.
    Testing this tale for themselves, Springer High School biology students cut open about 40 seeds, all of which revealed a spoon shape that is supposed to signify heavy and wet snowfall this year.
    The unseen options for kernel shapes are a fork signifying a mild winter and a knife signifying icy, cutting winds.
    "We were all expecting a fork shape for a mild winter, but we opened up to spoons," said Sophomore Tiffany Jeffcoats.
    Teacher Lucy Knight said the lesson was an interactive and fun way to learn lab safety, graphing skills, statistics and percentages.
    "A lot of students these days are kinetic learners," Knight said. "They tend to learn better with hands-on activities."
    The seeds were gathered locally in the Arbuckle Mountains.
    The class also contacted the Noble Foundation to see what related information they could find. Students were told that while there was no scientific correlation to the tale, climatologists are predicting a colder and wetter winter than usual, just like the persimmons indicated.
    However, even after receiving such conclusive results, students are still skeptical of using a persimmon seed to predict weather.
    "I don't think that's how it happens. It's just a tale people tell," Jeffcoats said.
    Only time will tell if the seeds are right.
    "I hope it comes true, but I don't think it will," said Sophomore Clayton Roberts. "It's too dry here, and we rarely get snow,"
    However, that doesn't mean some students don't want the folklore to be true and to have a snowy winter.
    "It's dry, and I'm ready for snow," Roberts said. "It gets us out of school, and it's fun to play with."
    Roberts said his favorite snow activity is drifting in his go-cart.

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