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The Daily Ardmoreite
  • Lone Grove students make their mark on school

  • Art Club members are literally making their mark on Lone Grove Intermediate.
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  • Art Club members are literally making their mark on Lone Grove Intermediate.
    Students painted a mural of Lone Grove history that now hangs in the school's auditorium.
    "A goal I have for Art Club is to have permanent fixtures," said Art Teacher Sherri McBride. "They put a lot of hard work and effort into this."
    The Art Club, for students interested in learning more about the visual arts, meets once a month.
    Middle School Art Teacher Greg Dudley has experience with murals and spoke to the young students about how to create one.
    "Adults learned as well as students," McBride said.
    Students learned how to grid out a drawing and researched what they wanted to draw.
    "Lone Grove is over 100 years old," said Fourth-grader Cooper Garrison. "I've seen old houses, but I didn't think Lone Grove was that old."
    They also learned to meet a deadline, the importance of commitment and teamwork.
    "If this is your job, you have to meet your deadline or you won't have a job very long," McBride said. "They learned the process and also life lessons."
    The mural contains six panels, three on each side of the auditorium. It was unveiled on Nov. 16, the night of the school auction.
    The project definitely proved a challenge for the students, who had to have extra meetings to get the project done on time.
    "No matter how big it is, you can get it done," said Fourth-grader Nate Sudderth. "It was fun to paint with my friends and draw with my friends."
    Fifth-grader Daria DeValve plans to be a fashion designer, and enjoys the lessons provided by Art Club.
    "I learned teamwork. You have to get along with other people here and as a fashion designer," she said.
    Garrison said the car and the people were a challenge to paint.
    "It was mostly because there were a lot of details, and I usually paint animals," he said.
    On the other side of things, the trees proved to be easy in comparison.
    "The trees are one big thing and no details," said Third-grader Madison Cheek.

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