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The Daily Ardmoreite
Managing your daily tasks and home with ease
Easter Egg Hunt Know-How
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About this blog
By Sonya McDaniel
OSU Cooperative Extension has great tips for homeowners to make their house a safe, healthy and stress-free environment. Of course, the information provided is based on reliable research which is proven to be effective and safe.

Sonya ...
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The Everyday Home
OSU Cooperative Extension has great tips for homeowners to make their house a safe, healthy and stress-free environment. Of course, the information provided is based on reliable research which is proven to be effective and safe.

Sonya McDaniel is the Family and Consumer Science Extension Educator for Pottawatomie County. Her job is to deliver information over basic home economic skills to the public. She has 15 years of experience in teaching basic family relations, nutrition and meal planning, family budgeting and household management through the OSU system.

She owns a small farming operation with her husband in southern Pottawatomie County where they raise hair sheep, goats and cattle. They are busy keeping up with an on-the-go child, 5 dogs and one giant cat. Sonya definitely understands that running a home and family takes thought, time and money which all seem to be in limited supply!

Oklahoma Cooperative Extension service does not discriminate because of race, color, national origin, religion, gender, age, disability, or status as a Vietnam-era veteran and is an equal opportunity employer.

Email: sonya.mcdaniel@okstate.edu

Website: www.oces.okstate.edu/pottawatomie

Facebook: Pottawatomie County OSU Extension
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By Sonya McDaniel
March 29, 2013 1:23 p.m.

Easter Egg Hunt Know-How
A little off of my usual “hop along housing” path, but very timely given this weekend’s celebrations.  Many people will be hosting Easter Egg hunts and doing some traditional Easter Egg dying with children.  These can be great memories and family traditions, but don’t let one of those memories be food poisoning!    
  • Only use eggs that have been refrigerated, and discard eggs that are cracked or dirty.
  • When cooking, place a single layer of eggs in a saucepan. Add water to at least one inch above the eggs. Cover the pan, bring the water to a boil, and carefully remove the pan from the heat. Let the eggs stand (18 minutes for extra large eggs, 15 minutes for large, 12 minutes for medium). Immediately run cold water over the eggs. When the eggs are cool enough to handle, place them in an uncovered container in the refrigerator where they can air-dry.
  • When decorating, be sure to use food-grade dyes. It is safe to use commercial egg dyes, liquid food coloring, and fruit-drink powders. When handling eggs, be careful not to crack them. Otherwise, bacteria could enter the egg through the cracks in the shell.
  • Keep hard-cooked Easter eggs chilled on a shelf inside the refrigerator, not in the refrigerator door.
  • Hide the eggs in places that are protected from dirt, pets and other potential sources of bacteria.
  • Remember the two hour rule, and make sure the “found” eggs are back in the refrigerator or consumed within two hours.
  • Remember that hard-boiled eggs are only safe to eat for one week after cooking.
  • Hope everyone has a wonderful weekend and happy hunting!
    This article is part of the Partnership for Food Safety Campaign www.fightbac.org   

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