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The Daily Ardmoreite
Got a minute? Your health deserves it. Check this blog for the latest medical news, healthy living tips and more.

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor.
UV Index, UVA and UVB rays
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By Health Minute
Mercy is the sixth largest Catholic health care system in the U.S. and serves more than 3 million people annually. Mercy includes 31 hospitals, nearly 300 outpatient facilities, 38,000 co-workers and 1,700 integrated physicians in Arkansas, Kansas, ...
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Mercy's Health Minute
Mercy is the sixth largest Catholic health care system in the U.S. and serves more than 3 million people annually. Mercy includes 31 hospitals, nearly 300 outpatient facilities, 38,000 co-workers and 1,700 integrated physicians in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma. Mercy also has outreach ministries in Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. For more about Mercy, visit www.mercy.net .
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July 30, 2013 12:01 a.m.
www.fda.gov
By Health Minute
May 9, 2013 12:01 a.m.



The UV Index





The UV index forecasts the intensity of ultraviolet (UV) light for any given day. The index helps people know what precautions to take to avoid sunburn or other skin damage from being in the sun too long.



  • 0 to 2: Low exposure to UV rays is expected for that day. It is important to remember to wear sunglasses on bright days and to cover up the skin if it burns easily. Snow and water can reflect the sun's rays and increase the UV strength. Skiers and swimmers should take special care: they should wear sunglasses or goggles, and apply sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15.


  • 3 to 5: Moderate exposure is expected for that day. Anyone who will be outside should cover his or her skin and eyes. Staying in the shade between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the sun is the strongest is best.


  • 6 to 7: High exposure is expected for that day. Protective measures include covering up by wearing a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, staying in the shade between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., and using a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15.


  • 8 to 10: Very high exposure is expected for that day. Protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and sunglasses should be worn. Other protective measures include staying in the shade between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. and using a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Doing routine outdoor activities such as gardening or playing sports should be based on how long the person will be exposed to the sun.


  • 11+: Extreme exposure is expected for that day. Unprotected skin can burn in minutes. Everyone should cover up and wear a hat and sunglasses. White sand and other bright surfaces reflect UV and will increase UV exposure. It is very important to stay in the shade between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. and to use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. The sunscreen should be reapplied every 2 hours.








The sunlight that reaches the earth has ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B (UVA and UVB) rays. These ultraviolet rays are the main causes of damage to the skin from the sun. UVA and UVB rays affect the skin's sensitivity to sun exposure in different ways.

UVA:





  • Can pass through window glass.


  • Is not affected by a change in altitude or weather.


  • Is present all day and every day of the year.


  • Penetrates deep into skin layers.


  • Is 20 times more abundant than UVB rays.


  • Causes long-term skin damage.




UVB:





  • Cannot pass through window glass.


  • Causes sunburn.


  • Causes tanning.


  • Helps the body make vitamin D.


  • Is more intense:



    • During the middle of the day.


    • In the summer.


    • At high altitudes and near the equator.






  • Can cause skin cancer and cataracts.




Use a sunscreen that has a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15 or higher. Sunscreens that say "broad-spectrum" can protect the skin from ultraviolet A and B (UVA and UVB) rays.

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