New guidelines for the implementation of medical marijuana came out of a state board of health meeting on Tuesday. 

According to the new guidelines, dispensaries will need to be staffed with a pharmacist, smoke-able medical marijuana will be prohibited along with most kinds of edible cannabis. Pills, oil, liquid, tincture, ointments and creams will still be legal under the new rules and prescribed marijuana can only contain a THC concentration of up to 20 percent. 

Oklahoma State Department of Health Communications Director Tony Sellars said some recommendations came from the health department’s committee, but many agencies were involved in the process. 

“We’ve had an inter-agency work group comprised by a lot of state agencies that are going to be impacted,” Sellars said. “Some of the things were requested by other entities.” 

Over 1,000 public comments from doctors, patients, organizations and advocates were also compiled during the process. They can be seen at http://omma.ok.gov/. 

Other rules adopted by the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority include guidelines for licensing and rules stating that marijuana is subject to the same public smoking laws as tobacco in Oklahoma.  

New Health Solutions Oklahoma Director Bud Scott, whose organization is in favor of a special session by the legislature to implement medical marijuana legalization, said the added rules would prove prohibitively expensive for dispensaries and patients. 

“The pharmacist requirement is a pure money grab,” Scott said. “Dispensaries will cost immediately more and these costs will ultimately be passed down to the patients.” 

Scott said limiting the forms in which marijuana can be prescribed can have a negative impact on patients, as different forms are used for different purposes. For example, cannabis works more quickly when smoked than when ingested. 

“The blanket prohibition of the smoke-able forms, that really limits the way many people use these products,” Scott said. “All of this just reinforces the need for a special session to address these issues, to make sure the will of the people is enforced.”the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority include guidelines for licensing and rules stating that marijuana is subject to the same public smoking laws as tobacco in Oklahoma. 

New Health Solutions Oklahoma Director Bud Scott, whose organization is in favor of a special session by the legislature to implement medical marijuana legalization, said the added rules would prove prohibitively expensive for dispensaries and patients. 

“The pharmacist requirement is a pure money grab,” Scott said. “Dispensaries will cost immediately more and these costs will ultimately be passed down to the patients.” 

Scott said limiting the forms in which marijuana can be prescribed can have a negative impact on patients, as different forms are used for different purposes. For example, cannabis works more quickly when smoked than when ingested. 

“The blanket prohibititon of the smoke-able forms, that really limits the way many people use these products,” Scott said. “All of this just reinforces the need for a special session to address these issues, to make sure the will of the people is enforced.”