Survey of 1,000 American Adults

 

Many aren’t convinced that recent protests around the country in response to grand jury decisions involving police officers will bring about desired changes and think such protests are controlled by outsiders. But adults who have participated in protests themselves are slightly less skeptical.

 

Just 19 percent of the 1,000 of American adults who participated in a national poll believe the recent protests following the grand jury decisions in Ferguson, Missouri and on Staten Island, New York, are likely to bring about the changes the protesters are seeking. The survey found that 66 percent say it’s unlikely the protests will bring about desired change. This includes 2 percent who say it’s very likely such protests will bring about change and 28 percent who say that’s not at all likely.

 

But then only 32 percent think that, generally speaking, these protesters reflect the concerns of their neighbors. A majority (53 percent) think the protests are staged by special interest groups and outside agitators.

 

Just 22 percent think protests like those taking place currently around the country are effective. Sixty percent see them more as an aggravation. Seventeen percent are undecided.

 

One-in-four adults (23 percent) report having participated in a public protest of some kind.

 

Thirty-eight percent of those who have participated in a public protest think the recent protests will bring about the desired changes, compared to 27 percent of those who have never protested. Forty percent of those who have protested in the past say such protests are effective, but only 17 percent of those who haven’t agree. A plurality (49 percent) of past protesters think the current demonstrators reflect the concerns of their neighbors, but 58 percent of those who haven’t protested believe they are staged by special interest groups and outsiders.