I found myself watching “Harry Potter and The Goblet of Fire” last night, absorbing the adventure of an orphaned young man whose family is murdered by a terrorizing group known as “death-eaters.” A band of faces hiding behind masks, who seek power through fear, allegiance through sacrifice, and legacy through hate. In this film, the [...]

I found myself watching “Harry Potter and The Goblet of Fire” last night, absorbing the adventure of an orphaned young man whose family is murdered by a terrorizing group known as “death-eaters.” A band of faces hiding behind masks, who seek power through fear, allegiance through sacrifice, and legacy through hate. In this film, the word “muggles” describe non-witch folks and the word “half-blood” references one who is not of pure blood. In the muggle world, witches are designated as freaks, people not only misunderstood but often times cast out of families. Other families enjoy their mixed child and foster their gifts. But the death-eaters worship fear and hate as their Gods, honoring a leader who lost most of his life energy in the massacre that killed the main character's parents.

Harry Potter was not treated kindly, outcast in the family of his mother, who long harbored hate for her sister,  a hate that was cultivated from envy. He was kept in stairs beneath the staircase, made to be a servant, and denied even the kindest word. He had every reason to foster emotions that could lead him to be like those who killed his own parents. Hate is an easy emotion, fear a welcome companion to it. Hate sometimes has strong merit, the loss of those we love to another's actions. That is a much harder form of hate to overcome, finding a way to fuel that hurt into an emotion that does not cage our laughter. But the hate of the death-eater is different. It comes from a place of superiority and belief, of a mindset of a hierarchy that renders some superior and others inferior. Labeling some as right and others as wrong, a division of ideologies or culture as the dividing line of who has merit and who does not.

Cont. in Part 2