Our world keeps grappling with this, while  technology has become a two headed beast for us. On one hand, we are aware of how the world can be different, countries whom have survived under the terror and instability of leaders who have poorly developed empathy and a highly developed desensitization to pain and suffering are able [...]

Our world keeps grappling with this, while  technology has become a two headed beast for us. On one hand, we are aware of how the world can be different, countries whom have survived under the terror and instability of leaders who have poorly developed empathy and a highly developed desensitization to pain and suffering are able to access ideas of how others live, beginning to find ways to fight against the systems that torment them. We are given the eye view of worlds where opportunity is a foreign concept, and freedom is nonexistent. We also become closer as a human race, our collective breath of wanting peace the air that unites us in a common goal.

The thing with Harry Potter and his cast of characters, is that, they face the same frailties and mistakes we do, even with magical wands and potions. They try to retain freedom in tragedy, they give or take house-points collectively, tying youth into a responsibility to one another. They understand that action is driven by intent and can evaluate what is warranted. This is where we stumble a bit, books are created worlds in which the author can tidy up endings, playing god upon pages. The real world isn't like this. It's a messy collection of intentions and culture imposed restrictions, with several “authors” based on the belief system a person follows, whether religious based or identification of group adherence based.

But either can cause damage when used to enforce one's will on another. Our world wants to blame, to find one manner in which to identify what we fear-but what we fear is not a person, it is a concept. It is the threat against our safety, the risk of our loved ones being hurt, the horror at mass harm rendered by strangers in masks, the possibility those strangers become our neighbors, our children's classmates. Sometimes, even our own children.

We don't know how to fight against a fear that sits next to us at a lunch table

Continued in Part 3