An overwhelming majority of voters continues to believe politicians don’t keep their campaign promises and are even more convinced it’s because they’ll say whatever it takes to get elected.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey of 1,000 likely U.S. voters finds that only 8 percent think most politicians keep their campaign promises. Still, that’s up from 4 percent in 2014 and ties the level measured in 2012. Eighty-one percent say most don’t keep the promises they make on the campaign trail. Eleven percent are undecided.

When it comes to why voters think politicians break their campaign promises, 51 percent think it’s because they deliberately made false promises to get elected. That’s the highest level measured in surveying since 2009. Thirty-eight percent think it is because of unforeseen events after they take office, down from 42 percent two years ago and 50 percent in 2012.

Large majorities of Republicans, Democrats and voters not affiliated with either political party agree that politicians don’t keep their campaign promises, though Democrats are more likely than the others to think that they do. But while most Republicans (60 percent) and unaffiliateds (57 percent) say politicians break them because they deliberately made false promises to get elected, most Democrats (53 percent) tend to think it is because of unforeseen events after taking office.