Creede Speake, Jr.

Obituaries in Ardmore, OK | The Daily Ardmoreite
Craddock Funeral Home

Creede Speake, Jr.

Ardmore - Creede Speake Jr. was born on June 17th 1924, and passed 97 years later on September 17th 2021. A memorial service will be held at the Milo Baptist Church Tuesday, September 21st 2021 at 10 AM with Rev. Mike Johnston officiating. Family and friends that may not be able to attend the service can watch it live streamed on the milobaptistchurch.org website or on YouTube at Milo Baptist Church.

Creede was born in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Creede and Jessie (Johnston) Speake and grew up in the Woodford community. His dad worked for the Humble Oil Company and they lived on a ranch at the water pump station where the Carter/Murray County line ran through the center of their house. Creede attended Graham school and graduated from Barnsdall High School in 1942.

Growing up through the Great Depression, he became very active and independent. His parents purchased several hundred acres nearby and started a ranch. He played baseball, built model airplanes, and enjoyed photography to the extent of developing his own pictures in a dark room he created. Creede hitchhiked to the 1939 World's Fair in New York at the age of fifteen with $7 dollars he had saved.

He entered Oklahoma A and M college in 1942 majoring in engineering. However, not long after he enlisted as an Aviation cadet in the United States Navy. His pre-flight training took him to Pensacola, Florida to fly F4F Wildcats in gunnery and fighter tactics. George H.W. Bush and Ted Williams were in his graduating class. Creede then moved to the US Marine Corps as he had an opportunity to fly the F4U Corsair. He was moved to El Toro, California where he staged in the Mojave. He received his commission in May 1944.

He was a member of the Black Jack Marine Corps fighter squadron and deployed to the Marshall Islands flying the F4U Corsair in combat. Creede received eight permanent citations for the Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal with his six Gold stars for heroism and extraordinary and meritorious achievements in aerial flights during operations against enemy Japanese forces in the Pacific War Area in 1945. At the end of the war he was dispatched to Yokosuka, Japan where he flew escort to the peace signing agreement and flew surveillance missions to locate undocumented prisoners of war in Japan.

Returning home in 1946 Creede returned to college at Oklahoma A and M. His professor held him after class soon after and asked him if there was anything else he could do because they weren't doing him any good. He recalled that after seeing so much the last few years all he could do is look out the window during class. He told his professor he might be able to lease a property in Pooleville and run a few cows. He hitchhiked home the next day and began a career in ranching.

Creede married Betty Jo Crews of Graham Ok and started a family soon after. They raised three children and were married 58 years until her death in 2003. Creede was recalled to active duty during the Korean conflict. He was attached to the 3rd Marine division at Camp Pendleton, California.

He had a long and successful career in the ranching and business community in Carter County. Soon after he started, a stranger named Carl Albert showed up at the ranch while he was shoeing a horse. Carl told him he was just back from the war and running for representative of the Third District and asked if he would be interested in doing some politicking for him. They formed a long-term friendship and Creede served as a delegate to DC as an advocate for the beef industry. He also served as President of the Oklahoma Cattleman's Association, the National Beef Board, and on the Natural Resource Conservation Board. He was also proud of his affiliation with First National Bank and Trust of Ardmore. He often said he survived the Nixon price freeze, Jimmy Carter and the Dairy Buyout. He managed through numerous severe droughts and built a commercial enterprise from the ground up.

More than anything Creede loved people and made so many long-term relationships. The combination of his magnetic personality, his incredible recall, grit, determination, positive attitude and genuine goodwill set him in a category all his own.

Creede Speake Jr. was preceded in death by his parents, his wife Betty, daughters Debby and Nancy, and son Crews. He is survived by his daughter Cindy Williams of Ardmore, grandsons Travis Ritter and wife, Lynzi of Ardmore and Creede Williams and wife, Lori of Dallas, TX; granddaughters Sarah Ritter and husband, Ruben Mercado of Louisville, CO and BJ Marsh of Edmond, OK; six great-grandchildren, Hannah and Emma Ritter, Reid Marsh, Lucy Mercado, Creede Hudson and Charlotte Williams; sister Hazel Rozzell and husband, Harold; numerous nieces and nephews.

Memorials may be made to OCA Foundation Scholarship, 2500 Exchange Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73108 in memory of Creede Speake, Jr. or Boys Ranch Town, 5100 E. 33rd Street Edmond, OK 73013. Online condolences may be made at craddockfuneralhome.com.

Posted online on September 18, 2021

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Obituaries in Ardmore, OK | The Daily Ardmoreite

Creede Speake, Jr.

Craddock Funeral Home

Creede Speake, Jr.

Ardmore - Creede Speake Jr. was born on June 17th 1924, and passed 97 years later on September 17th 2021. A memorial service will be held at the Milo Baptist Church Tuesday, September 21st 2021 at 10 AM with Rev. Mike Johnston officiating. Family and friends that may not be able to attend the service can watch it live streamed on the milobaptistchurch.org website or on YouTube at Milo Baptist Church.

Creede was born in Ardmore, Oklahoma to Creede and Jessie (Johnston) Speake and grew up in the Woodford community. His dad worked for the Humble Oil Company and they lived on a ranch at the water pump station where the Carter/Murray County line ran through the center of their house. Creede attended Graham school and graduated from Barnsdall High School in 1942.

Growing up through the Great Depression, he became very active and independent. His parents purchased several hundred acres nearby and started a ranch. He played baseball, built model airplanes, and enjoyed photography to the extent of developing his own pictures in a dark room he created. Creede hitchhiked to the 1939 World's Fair in New York at the age of fifteen with $7 dollars he had saved.

He entered Oklahoma A and M college in 1942 majoring in engineering. However, not long after he enlisted as an Aviation cadet in the United States Navy. His pre-flight training took him to Pensacola, Florida to fly F4F Wildcats in gunnery and fighter tactics. George H.W. Bush and Ted Williams were in his graduating class. Creede then moved to the US Marine Corps as he had an opportunity to fly the F4U Corsair. He was moved to El Toro, California where he staged in the Mojave. He received his commission in May 1944.

He was a member of the Black Jack Marine Corps fighter squadron and deployed to the Marshall Islands flying the F4U Corsair in combat. Creede received eight permanent citations for the Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal with his six Gold stars for heroism and extraordinary and meritorious achievements in aerial flights during operations against enemy Japanese forces in the Pacific War Area in 1945. At the end of the war he was dispatched to Yokosuka, Japan where he flew escort to the peace signing agreement and flew surveillance missions to locate undocumented prisoners of war in Japan.

Returning home in 1946 Creede returned to college at Oklahoma A and M. His professor held him after class soon after and asked him if there was anything else he could do because they weren't doing him any good. He recalled that after seeing so much the last few years all he could do is look out the window during class. He told his professor he might be able to lease a property in Pooleville and run a few cows. He hitchhiked home the next day and began a career in ranching.

Creede married Betty Jo Crews of Graham Ok and started a family soon after. They raised three children and were married 58 years until her death in 2003. Creede was recalled to active duty during the Korean conflict. He was attached to the 3rd Marine division at Camp Pendleton, California.

He had a long and successful career in the ranching and business community in Carter County. Soon after he started, a stranger named Carl Albert showed up at the ranch while he was shoeing a horse. Carl told him he was just back from the war and running for representative of the Third District and asked if he would be interested in doing some politicking for him. They formed a long-term friendship and Creede served as a delegate to DC as an advocate for the beef industry. He also served as President of the Oklahoma Cattleman's Association, the National Beef Board, and on the Natural Resource Conservation Board. He was also proud of his affiliation with First National Bank and Trust of Ardmore. He often said he survived the Nixon price freeze, Jimmy Carter and the Dairy Buyout. He managed through numerous severe droughts and built a commercial enterprise from the ground up.

More than anything Creede loved people and made so many long-term relationships. The combination of his magnetic personality, his incredible recall, grit, determination, positive attitude and genuine goodwill set him in a category all his own.

Creede Speake Jr. was preceded in death by his parents, his wife Betty, daughters Debby and Nancy, and son Crews. He is survived by his daughter Cindy Williams of Ardmore, grandsons Travis Ritter and wife, Lynzi of Ardmore and Creede Williams and wife, Lori of Dallas, TX; granddaughters Sarah Ritter and husband, Ruben Mercado of Louisville, CO and BJ Marsh of Edmond, OK; six great-grandchildren, Hannah and Emma Ritter, Reid Marsh, Lucy Mercado, Creede Hudson and Charlotte Williams; sister Hazel Rozzell and husband, Harold; numerous nieces and nephews.

Memorials may be made to OCA Foundation Scholarship, 2500 Exchange Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73108 in memory of Creede Speake, Jr. or Boys Ranch Town, 5100 E. 33rd Street Edmond, OK 73013. Online condolences may be made at craddockfuneralhome.com.

Posted online on September 18, 2021