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Active COVID cases reach all-time high for Carter County

Robby Short
robby.short@ardmoreite.com
According to the Oklahoma Department of Health, the total number of presumed active COVID-19 infections in Carter Counted reached a new high Saturday.

According to the Oklahoma Department of Health, the total number of presumed active COVID-19 infections in Carter Counted reached a new high Saturday with a combined 21 new reported cases for Friday and Saturday, with only 12 new recoveries during the span. 

Saturday’s number of 77 saw the new high increase by two from the previously reported high of 75 from nearly a week ago. The numbers dipped to 65 mid-week before beginning the new expansion.

The bulk of the new confirmed cases are confined to the city of Ardmore, with all but two of the active cases associated with the city. Since data began being reported, Ardmore alone has recorded 493 infections, seven deaths and 418 recoveries associated with the disease. 

The surge in new infections mirror a surge across the state with 2,379 new infections reported over the two-day span with 2,514 new presumed recoveries.

Across the state, the seven-day average for new recoveries matched the seven-day average for new infections for the first time since the state began releasing data, both numbers came in at 1,034 for the span, with the new infections erasing a seven-day trend of declining numbers.

The state reported 16 new deaths associated with the disease over the two-day span as the seven-day average fell below seven total, the lowest average since September 24.

According to data released by the state, Oklahoma currently has 12,700 presumably active COVID-19 infections, the state’s lowest number of active infections since September 26.

According to the Oklahoma Department of Health, the true number of cases in Oklahoma is likely higher because many people have not been tested and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death.