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New state infections drop significantly as county numbers increase

Robby Short
robby.short@ardmoreite.com
The total number of new COVID-19 infections from Sunday and Monday combined were nearly half the average totals seen during the previous three-day span heading into the weekend for the State of Oklahoma, reversing a trend of spiking infections.

The total number of new COVID-19 infections from Sunday and Monday combined were nearly half the average totals seen during the previous three-day span heading into the weekend for the State of Oklahoma, reversing a trend of spiking infections.

The same two-day period saw numbers in Carter County increase by 15, bringing the total active number of cases to 86  — a new high for the county. Carter County has seen a total of 606 positive infections and 511 new recoveries — six new recoveries were reported for Sunday and Monday.

The new infections brought the state’s running total to 91,982 with four new deaths reported since Sunday— increasing the state’s reported deaths connected to COVID-19 to 1,055.

Monday’s reported new infections brought the state’s seven-day average to 969, the lowest since September 17, falling below 1,000 new reported infections for the first time in 16 days. The total number of presumed active infections for the state also continued to decline from the high-water marks set last week. New recoveries fell over the weekend, to nearly half of the average of more than 1,000 per day seen the week prior. Overall, the state has seen the seven-day average for new recoveries spike to all-time highs starting Saturday, with a running average of more than 1,000 per day, the highest since the onset of the pandemic. The 14-day average for new infections also fell to a two-week low, continuing a weeklong trend of declining numbers.

The true number of cases in Oklahoma is likely higher because many people have not been tested and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death.