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COVID infections mark new milestone in Carter County

Robby Short
robby.short@ardmoreite.com
On Saturday, a combined 26 newly reported infections of COVID-19 pushed Carter County’s presumed active infections over the 100 mark for the first since the pandemic began in March.

On Saturday, a combined 26 newly reported infections of COVID-19 pushed Carter County’s presumed active infections over the 100 mark for the first time since the pandemic began in March. 

The total presumed active cases reported on Saturday were double those reported just a month prior on September 10.

The new infections comes on the heels of several area schools recent decision to move to distance learning, including Wilson and Marietta while other school districts have had to make accommodations for active infections within their districts.

New infections in Carter County have steadily increased since the start of October after declining slightly at the end of September. 

Carter County has recorded 652 infections, 9 deaths and 540 presumed recoveries since reporting began in March.

For the state, Saturday marked back to back days with more than 1,500 new infections, marking the highest consecutive newly reported infections since reporting began.

The new infections brought the state’s seven-day average to 1,174, the highest it’s been since September 28.

Ten newly reported deaths on Friday and Saturday brought the state’s total to 1,095 since March, nearly five times higher than the state’s record for flu deaths set in 2018.

An average of 108 Oklahoma residents per day have been hospitalized in the previous five days due to COVID-19, the highest five day total since reporting began.

The true number of cases in Oklahoma is likely higher because many people have not been tested and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death.