Lone Grove moves to distance learning as Oklahoma, Carter County's reported COVID infections increase

Robby Short
robby.short@ardmoreite.com
As of Monday, Ardmore is associated with 84 active infections, with Lone Grove accounting for 16, Wilson accounting for six, Healdton accounting for three and Springer accounting for the remaining two infections.

Lone Grove became the latest area school district to transition to distance learning  after the school announced over social media on Sunday that a faculty member had tested positive for COVID-19.

According to a release sent out by Lone Grove superintendent Meri Jayne Miller, the school will continue to distribute meals until the school is scheduled to reopen on October 26 with the exception of October 16-19 while the school is observing its previously scheduled Fall Break.

Carter County saw a combined 20 new infections reported since Sunday, bringing the presumed active number of infections in the county to 111. 

As of Monday, Ardmore is associated with 84 active infections, with Lone Grove accounting for 16, Wilson accounting for six, Healdton accounting for three and Springer accounting for the remaining two infections.

Monday’s data includes a combined 12 new recoveries for the county over the same two-day span. 

Statewide, COVID-19 infections crossed the 100,000 threshold Monday with a combined 1,563 new infections reported since Sunday. Monday’s data includes nine new deaths over the same two-day span along with 66 new hospitalizations. 

The seven-day average for new infections continued to tick up, reaching 1,170 per day while the seven-day average for new recoveries reversed a four-day trend of sub-1,000 recoveries, yet still marked the fifth consecutive day where more new infections were reported than new recoveries. 

The true number of cases in Oklahoma is likely higher because many people have not been tested and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death.