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Southern Tech joins growing list of schools moving to distance learning as COVID infections increase

Robby Short
robby.short@ardmoreite.com
More than 1,300 new infections were reported Tuesday for the state, including nine additional new infections for Carter County.

Late Monday, Southern Tech joined the growing list of area schools to announce a temporary transition to distance learning as statewide infections of COVID-19 continue to surge. 

More than 1,300 new infections were reported Tuesday for the state, including nine additional new infections for Carter County. 

Tuesday’s newly reported infections in Carter County marked the 15th consecutive day where presumably active infections increased or remained flat.

The state’s total for presumed active cases ticked up again Tuesday after declining just two days prior, reaching 13,872 presumedly active cases, the second highest single day total since reporting began, both of which have occurred over the last four days. 

Tuesday’s report from the Oklahoma Department of Health included 15 newly recorded deaths associated with the disease, none of which occurred within the previous 24 hours. 

The true number of cases in Oklahoma is likely higher because many people have not been tested and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick.

Seven of the newly reported deaths were in the 65 and up age group, five were in the 50-64 age group and one was in the 36-49 age group. 

To date, the 65 and up age group has accounted for just under 14% of the states total confirmed infections and more than 80% of the deaths associated with the disease, with 897 total deaths within the age group being reported since March. The deaths of 1,119 Oklahoma residents have been connected with the disease since reporting began in March.

The 18-35 age group has accounted for 35% of all confirmed cases within the state and just 1% of the reported associated deaths with13 total. 

Included in Tuesday’s data release was a revision in the reported daily new hospitalizations from COVID-19. The revision reduced the total number of those hospitalized due to the infection by 19. It also reduced the state’s seven-day average for new hospitalizations by more than 20, bringing the total to its lowest point since October 6.

The state’s seven-day average for new infections declined slightly as well but continues a seven-day trend of 1,000 plus new infections.

Tuesday’s new recoveries jumped by nearly 500, reaching 1,237 for the day, the highest single day recoveries since October 3, eight of which were recorded within Carter County.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death.