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COVID-19 infections continue to increase

Robby Short
robby.short@ardmoreite.com
The Oklahoma Department of Health reported an additional 14 new COVID-19 infections and nine new recoveries Wednesday for Carter County extending the seven-day average for new infections into double digits for the third consecutive day.

The Oklahoma Department of Health reported an additional 14 new COVID-19 infections and nine new recoveries Wednesday for Carter County extending the seven-day average for new infections into double digits for the third consecutive day.

Carter County’s presumed active COVID-19 infections increased to 117, the ninth consecutive day where the total number of active infections has increased.

Statewide, 1,122 new infections were recorded on Wednesday along with 13 new deaths, 114 new hospitalizations and 1,073 new recoveries. 

Of the 13 new deaths reported on Wednesday, none occurred during the previous 24 hours. The new deaths included an Oklahoma County male, age 18-35. Ten of Wednesday’s reported deaths were in the 65 and older age group.

According to the report, 749 Oklahomans remain hospitalized due to the disease.

The state’s seven-day average for new cases increased to 1,180, the highest seven-day average since the pandemic began in March. The 14-day average for new infections increased to 1,101, also marking the highest recorded since March.

To date, 102,615 positive COVID-19 infections have been recorded, of which 87,575 have gone on to recover and 1,132 have died. As many as 13,908 confirmed positive COVID-19 infections are presumably still active statewide, which is also the highest number reported to date. Carter County has recorded 695 confirmed infections since March — 131 of which reported in October alone — 569 of which have gone on to recover. Carter County has recorded nine deaths associated with the disease, the last of which was reported on September 30.

The true number of cases in Oklahoma is likely higher because many people have not been tested and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death.