Active Carter County infections jump to 142

Robby Short
robby.short@ardmoreite.com
With 29 new confirmed COVID-19 infections, the number of presumably active infections within Carter County reached 142, a new high water mark for the pandemic.

With 29 new confirmed COVID-19 infections on Saturday, the number of presumably active infections within Carter County reached 142, a new high water mark for the pandemic.

According to the Oklahoma Department of Health, active infections in the county dropped from 128 to 123 on Friday before surging forward Saturday.

The new infections followed the statewide trend as 1,829 new infections were reported, eclipsing the previous single day high of 1,628 new infections reported Thursday.

The state reported 24 new COVID-19 related deaths and another 190 related hospitalizations since Thursday.

The death toll associated with COVID-19 has reached double-digit for five consecutive days for the second time during the pandemic. The first five-day stretch came less than a week ago. Ten of the last 12 days have seen reported deaths reach double digits, with 141 deaths being reported during that span.

During that same 12-day span, 1,076 Oklahomans were hospitalized by the disease with a reported 956 reported hospitalized on Friday.

According to the Oklahoma Department of Health’s weekly epidemiology and surveillance report, the current trend of new positive infections continues to reflect community transmission, which can be reduced by keeping six feet of physical distance from others, wearing face coverings when around individuals from outside the household, avoiding touching your face, and regular hand-washing.

The report also showed a 20% increase of new infections and a 34% increase in new deaths from the week prior.

The true number of coronavirus cases in Oklahoma is likely higher because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick.

For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and death.