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Carter County records third November COVID death

Robby Short
robby.short@ardmoreite.com
Statewide, Oklahoma reported 2,357 new infections on Thursday, pushing the seven-day average to a new high of 2,116 new infections. Thursday’s 14-day average reached 1,749 for the state, also a new high.

Thursday’s reported death of a Carter County man associated with COVID-19 matched the monthly high for deaths in the county since the pandemic began in March.

The man — in the 65 and older age group — was the third reported death for the county in November and the 13th overall since the first death was reported on April 27. 

Ten additional deaths were reported in Oklahoma by the Oklahoma Department of Health on Thursday, increasing the state’s November death toll to 144. Oklahoma has recorded 1,481 deaths associated with the disease since March with 302 being reported in October.

Active infections in the county remained above 200 for the second consecutive day — after beginning the month with 154 active infections.

The 209 new infections reported for the month of November puts the county on pace to surpass the total of 344 new reported infections for the month of October.

Statewide, Oklahoma reported 2,357 new infections on Thursday, pushing the seven-day average to a new high of 2,116 new infections. Thursday’s 14-day average reached 1,749 for the state, also a new high.

The state reported 162 new hospitalizations either due to COVID-19 or suspected of COVID-19 on Thursday, bringing November’s total for Oklahomans being hospitalized by the disease to 1,241.

According to the Oklahoma Department of Health, the state’s hospitals reported four new hospitalizations due to seasonal influenza for the week of November 1-7, bringing the total number of hospitalizations due to influenza to 39 since September 1. 

The true number of coronavirus cases in Oklahoma is likely higher because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick.

For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and death.