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COVID deaths reach new high

Robby Short
robby.short@ardmoreite.com
Oklahoma set a new single day high for deaths associated with COVID-19 Saturday. The Oklahoma Health Department reported 23 new deaths Saturday, following Friday’s total of 12.

Oklahoma set a new single day high for deaths associated with COVID-19 Saturday. The Oklahoma Health Department reported 23 new deaths Saturday, following Friday’s total of 12.

The state also reported 2,847 new confirmed infections of the disease, marking the fourth straight day where new infections topped the 2,000 mark.

With 165 new hospitalizations, the state has now recorded 160 or more new hospitalizations in three of the last four days.

The number of presumably active COVID-19 infections in Oklahoma have surged throughout November. Saturday’s 25,356 presumably active infections is a 60% increase from the presumably active infections reported at the first of the month.

In Carter County, the presumably active infections grew to 236, most notably Rep. Tammy Townley, R-Ardmore, tested positive for the disease.

According to the Associated Press, Townley was one of two members of the Oklahoma House of Representatives confirmed Friday to have tested positive for the coronavirus, just days after a swearing-in ceremony at the Capitol in which many lawmakers and their families weren't wearing masks or practicing social distancing.

The Davis News reported on Friday that Buford Manor — an assisted living facility in Davis — had 28 residents and 15 employees test positive for COVID-19.

Roughly 14% of all confirmed infections of COVID-19 in Oklahoma have been recorded by individuals in the 65 and older age group. The same demographic has accounted for 80% of all deaths associated with the disease.

The true number of coronavirus cases in Oklahoma is likely higher because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick.

For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and death.