December begins with deadly COVID trend for Carter County

Robby Short
robby.short@ardmoreite.com
For Carter County, the seven-day average for new cases fell below 40 for the first time since Friday after a sharp jump in new daily case just days before.

Carter County began the month of December on a deadly trend, recording its 15th COVID related death since the onset of the pandemic.

The newest reported death came a day after the county and the state marked the worst month on record for deaths, hospitalizations and infections from the disease.

As of Tuesday, the county was responsible for 345 of the 30,318 presumably active infections throughout the state.

Tuesday’s death in Carter County, that of a man in the 50-64 age group was one of 15 new deaths reported for the state. The statewide seven-day average for new deaths has remained in double digits since November 14 and has fallen below that threshold twice in the last 70 days.

For Carter County, the seven-day average for new cases fell below 40 for the first time since Friday after a sharp jump in new daily case just days before. 

Statewide, presumably active infections fell to a 10-day low.

According to OSDH and U.S. Census Bureau data compiled by The Ardmoreite, McCurtain County is also experiencing some of the worst rates of death linked to COVID-19 in Oklahoma. 

McCurtain County has experienced 137 deaths per 100,000 residents, second only to Greer County. By comparison, Carter County has recorded about 31 deaths per 100,000 residents.

The true number of cases in Oklahoma is likely higher because many people have not been tested and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and death.

Michael D. Smith contributed to the reporting in this article.