December ramps up deadly COVID-19 trend for Oklahoma, flu hospitalizations reported

Robby Short
robby.short@ardmoreite.com
The deaths of 2,144 Oklahoma residents have now been linked to COVID-19 since the onset of the pandemic in March.

With 16 new deaths associated with COVID-19 on Thursday, Oklahoma is now just five deaths shy of surpassing November’s total for reported deaths, which set the previous record for the highest cumulative number of deaths for any month since the pandemic began in March.

According to data reported by the Oklahoma Department of Health and compiled by The Ardmoreite, the seven-day average for new deaths dropped slightly on Thursday after 46 new deaths were reported on Wednesday.

The deaths of 2,144 Oklahoma residents have now been linked to COVID-19 since the onset of the pandemic in March.

The number of presumably active cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma continued to fall Thursday, but remained above the 31,000 mark for a seventh consecutive day.

In Carter County, the number of presumably active cases remained above 300 for the fifth consecutive day after dropping dramatically about nine days ago. The seven-day average for new cases in the county has steadily increased over that same five-day span to nearly the all-time high set during the last week of November.

The true number of coronavirus cases in Oklahoma is likely higher because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick.

Meanwhile, six new hospitalizations due to influenza were reported by the ODH on Thursday. A total of 84 Oklahoma residents have been hospitalized with the flu since the season began on September 1. No deaths from influenza have been reported to date.

For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and death.